What Types of Cars Are Most Likely to Be Involved in a Deadly Accident?

Car ownership is essential to many Oregon residents. But if you’re like most people, deciding which car to purchase and drive can be an arduous task. Many factors go into the analysis. Who will primarily drive the car? What styling and features do you find appealing? Of course, affordability is always a concern. Some purchasers prioritize environmental friendliness. With Oregon’s gas prices among the highest in the nation, many Oregonians place great weight on fuel efficiency. Finally, safety is certainly a concern for most automobile owners.

When it comes to safety, some cars have better reputations than others. Of course, overall safety isn’t just about the way a car is engineered or built – it can be affected by other factors too, such as size, engine power, and the diligence of the driver. In this article, we’ll share some information on research concerning fatality records of a number of car models still often seen on the road.

Research and Conclusions on Specific Models

A website search engine for cars, www.iseecars.com, performed an analysis on fatalities arising from automobile crashes involving car models from years 2013 to 2017. In an effort to determine the cars most frequently involved in fatal crashes, the analysis states that it used data from two sources: (1) fatality data maintained by the U.S. Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS); and (2) data from in excess of 25 million used cars. Below are the car models that it determined were at least twice as likely to be involved in a fatal accident as the average vehicle:

  • Mitsubishi Mirage
  • Chevrolet Corvette
  • Honda Fit
  • Kia Forte
  • Chevrolet Spark
  • Subaru BRZ
  • Nissan 370Z
  • Nissan Versa
  • Kia Rio
  • Dodge Challenger
  • Chevrolet Camaro
  • Kia Soul
  • Hyundai Veloster Turbo
  • Nissan Versa Note

The analysis notes that subcompact cars and sports cars are represented most often on the list. The website’s CEO (Phong Ly) noted that sports cars prioritize speed and rapid acceleration. This may help explain their prevalence on the list.

With regard to subcompact cars, Mr. Ly noted that cars in the subcompact segment often perform below average on crash safety tests. The website also noted that subcompact cars may have fewer safety features than larger cars.

The Human Negligence Factor

While an analysis of crash data can certainly provide important information, the results above do not alone explain the causation of accidents. For example, a sports car doesn’t usually crash from the simple fact that it has a powerful engine and the ability to rapidly accelerate. Usually, human involvement is a factor. It’s often the use (or misuse) of speed and acceleration that results in a crash. In other words, had a driver not driven at high rates of speed or accelerated dangerously, an accident may never have happened.

Similarly, many subcompact cars are involved in deadly accidents due to no fault of their driver. It is often the negligence of another party that causes the deadly crash.

Under these types of scenarios, it’s essential that negligent drivers be held responsible for their dangerous conduct. And, of course, in those instances in which a car (or a part) is defectively designed or manufactured and causes the crash, the manufacturer or appropriate participant in the distribution chain should similarly be held accountable.

Call with Questions

If you’ve been injured in a car crash, you may have many questions about your rights. The experienced personal injury lawyers at Nelson MacNeil Rayfield will be happy to answer them for you. Whether your injuries are caused by another driver’s negligence or products liability, we can help. We believe that the only way to protect all Oregon drivers is to hold wrongdoers accountable for their harmful conduct.


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